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Latest Public Notebooks

  • Collecting tips and tricks from podcasts and blog posts

    • 1on1
    • Some backup topics if you have nothing else to chat about:
    • Report's growth
    • Manager's current disaster
    • Write a manager readme 
    • You ideally have 7 +/- 3 number of reports, (4 min, 10 max)
    • If you get the "twinge" (aka your spidey sense goes off), you can ask to clarify on the subject or "hmm..." to poke at it
    • You have the option of using longer, borderline uncomfortable pauses to grab conversation and change it as you need
    • If there’s 2-3 things you believe matters to being an effective manager, then go out and pursue diligently them 100 times, 1000 times.
    • Having 1on1s
    • Being on time. If people are late, kindly make the point at the beginning of the meeting that it's important to you and the team.


    • Note to self (not actual podcast content): In manager readme add list of topics you would love to talk about in one on one like what are you bored with. 



    • 1on1
    • Some backup topics if you have nothing else to chat about:
    • Report's growth
    • Manager's current disaster
    • Write a manager readme 
    • You ideally have 7 +/- 3 number of reports, (4 min, 10 max)
    • If you get the "twinge" (aka your spidey sense goes off), you can ask to clarify on the subject or "hmm..." to poke at it
    • You have the option of using longer, borderline uncomfortable pauses to grab conversation and change it as you need
    • If there’s 2-3 things you believe matters to being an effective manager, then go out and pursue diligently them 100 times, 1000 times.
    • Having 1on1s
    • Being on time. If people are late, kindly make the point at the beginning of the meeting that it's important to you and the team.


    • Note to self (not actual podcast content): In manager readme add list of topics you would love to talk about in one on one like what are you bored with. 



    • Write a manager readme guide
    • It will help accelerate familiarity between reports and manager, especially on growing teams


    • Servant leadership is harder and takes longer to execute than top-down, but builds a better team and team experience


    • Refer to rituals instead of meetings if they are repeating. More inviting



    • Find your reports’ motivations, which are different, and base your actions on those


    • Focus on making sure you’re paying attention when switching context between your teams


    • Block Friday off entirely to think and reset


    • New team and new project
    • Start with high frequency meetings upfront to clarify goals. Twice a week. Then step out when the team gels. Less cadence? More frequent when rolling out.


    • Start all hands meetings with digestible familiar metrics to think about how to impact them.


    • Follow great teams like you follow great job postings 


    • Giving feedback
    • Try to give feedback close to the moment, rather than waiting


    • Books
    • Tribal Leadership?



    • Direct Managers who don’t say hi in the hallway? Yikes.


    • Trust but verify, don’t be too easy or hard on your reports


    • Corporate world
    • Sometimes hard to get into meetings
    • Lack of transparency
    • With transparency, people can make the best decisions with available data. People can work in tandem without coordination 


    • Radical Candor
    • If people are complaining or gossiping behind backs, aim to approach others directly 


    • Temper your reactions, otherwise others won’t come to you anymore


    • Don’t underestimate others mimicking others in a group setting
    • People even start dressing the same
    • Happens involuntarily 
    • This is even more reason to hold yourself to a high standard


    • Experimenting with different approaches?
    • Split the team into groups and try different things in parallel
    • Benefit: Friendly competition
    • Keep your team close to customers


    • Career goals:
    • Titles and tiers are purely company retention tools 


    • In general, double down in your strengths, and not mitigating weaknesses


    • Books:
    • Culture Code


Latest Public Notes

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Highlights

A straightforward way to get our availability number is to add a bunch of these machines/nodes into a cluster.
July 14, 2021, 5:12 a.m.
Vertical scaling is basically "buying a bigger/stronger machine" - either a (virtual) machine with more cores, more processing, more memory. With distributed systems, vertically scaling is usually less popular as it can be more costly than scaling horizontally.
July 14, 2021, 5:11 a.m.
Horizontal scaling is about adding more machines (or nodes) to the system, to increase capacity. Horizontal scaling is the most popular way to scale distributed systems, especially, as adding (virtual) machines to a cluster is often as easy as a click of a button.
July 14, 2021, 5:11 a.m.
The two most common scaling strategies are vertical or horizontal scaling.
July 14, 2021, 5:10 a.m.
To make sure we build the right thing, a system that is "better" than it's predecessor, we used SLAs to define expectations.
July 14, 2021, 5:09 a.m.
Systems usually have a lot of noisy requests, hence the p95 and p99 latencies are more practical usage in the real world.
July 14, 2021, 5:06 a.m.
For many systems, the four nines availability (99.99%, or about 50 minutes downtime per year) is considered high availability.
July 14, 2021, 5:05 a.m.
Before diving into planning a system, I have found the most important thing to decide what a system that is "healthy" means. "Healthy" should be something that is actually measurable. The common way to measure "healthy" is with SLAs: service level agreements.
July 14, 2021, 4:52 a.m.
Before diving into planning a system, I have found the most important thing to decide what a system that is "healthy" means. "Healthy" should be something that is actually measurable. The common way to measure "healthy" is with SLAs: service level agreements.
July 14, 2021, 4:25 a.m.