If you use shell scripts to automate macOS applications, you may need to switch between, hide, show or quit applications. Need to launch an X11 application from Terminal but the X server isn't in front when you need it? Use appswitch to fix the problem. Or, if you'd like a version of the ps(1) utility which understands the concept of macOS applications, appswitch can help. #$tag_more #cli #dev #geeky #neat #%on_github #mac #shell #pub

"If you use shell scripts to automate macOS applications, you may need to switch between, hide, show or quit applications. Need to launch an X11 application from Terminal but the X server isn't in front when you need it? Use appswitch to fix the problem. Or, if you'd like a version of the ps(1) utility which understands the concept of macOS applications, appswitch can help. Apple provides a simple command-line launching program called open with macOS. launch offers several options that open doesn't. It: opens "slack" URLs (e.g. apple.com) and email addresses (-l) lets you specify applications by their four-character creator (e.g. 'ToyS') or Java-style bundle ID (e.g. com.apple.ScriptEditor2), both of which allow you to move or rename an application without changing references to it lets you find applications rather than opening them (-n) asks applications to print documents (-p) allows you to pipe output to any GUI application (not just TextEdit) displays extensive file, folder and volume information including type, creator, bundle ID, sizes, dates and versions (-f) reports errors intelligibly and much more! launch is useful by itself, but is even better when used in scripts. Assign a shell command to your favorite macOS text, graphics or resource editor. Browse your favorite Web site with a few keystrokes." #$tag_more #cli #dev #geeky #neat #%on_github #mac #shell #pub